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New Horizons Motorcycle Training and Tours

Combining Motorbike Touring with Training

Summary of our tours

Link to the latest tour dates and costs: NHMTT 2019 Tours and prices

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Anyone for camping?

One of the great aspects of touring is the freedom of the road. Coupled with camping then you become one with the journey.

As an avid camper having toured across Europe and of course the UK, New Horizons are developing a short camping trip of a couple of nights in the UK. Heading down to near Ilfracombe on the Devon coast, we can spend a couple of nights on a campsite with decent facilities and an onsite pub. Over the three days, we will learn what to take, what not to take and have some great riding too.

No dates yet, but let me know if this would be of interest. Aiming for late April, May for the first trip.

Future plan is to head across the Channel into France where camping is a national pastime. This will probably be in early July.

Again, drop me a line if this is of interest and I will get together a decent route (which I already know includes the Champagne region).

 

BBC Wiltshire Radio – Monday March 11th

Follow up from my last radio post “Back on the radio”

BBC Radio Wiltshire Monday March 11th at 10:15 and 10:30am, talking with Paul Banham a bus driving instructor, and Julie Murphy a car driving instructor and me talking about motorbike instruction.

The nice things is, we have similar common aims – promoting better and safer driving/riding.

Click link to listen live:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p071fcn0

 

How would you negotiate these bends?

The bends shown below are at a 50mph limit in a rural area, snaking in a right hand bend downhill, bearing round to the left into a second uphill right hander. There are metal drain covers en-route as well as poorly repaired road surfaces.

  • How fast would you be going?
  • Where would you position the bike?
  • What gear would you be in?
  • Would you brake through this series of bends – braking causes instability and increases the chance of skidding and losing control!
  • This road is great in the dry, but what about in the wet? How would your approach change, if at all?


Cornering on bends like these cause 12% of motorcycle crashes; 7% on left hand bends, and 5% on right hand bends with the majority occurring on unfamiliar roads.

Slightly further on the bend develops into this:

There are 5 key Principles of cornering which, in conjunction with the system of motorcycle control, IPSGA, New Horizons Motorcycle Training & Tours can coach you to maintain a smooth constant and safe speed through this set, or any other set, of bends and reduce your chance of becoming a statistic.

  • Be in the right position on the approaching
  • Be traveling at the right speed for the corner or bend – I can do 50mph through here, but that’s on my bike – yours, is different so speed could be faster or slower!
  • Have the right gear for that speed
  • Be able to stop in the distance you can see to be clear on your own side of the road
  • Open the throttle enough to maintain a constant speed round the bend – maintain positive throttle

The photo below shows the road from above – you can’t see the nasty dip though. And for info, this is just past a village called Charlton on the B4040, just before Malmesbury.

New Horizons Motorcycle Training & Tours can help you improve your cornering skills and techniques on roads like these whilst enjoying a few days touring.

Drop us a line using the Contact form. Or email direct to peter@newhorizonsmtt.com or stuart@newhorizonsmtt.com

And here is my approach to it, from both sides; first at 50mph, then at 40mph or so which is a  lot more comfortable due to road “furniture”. If the road had been repaired better then 50mph would be fine on the initial approach! I find my wheel gets caught in a rut – Grrrrr!!!!

 

Driving in Europe after Brexit – March 29th

Crikey! Bit of a minefield this one. All depends on whether we leave with a deal or not it seems. Lots of “maybe” but nothing definite, other than that there will be no change in driving license or insurance requirements for EU nationals coming to the UK for a holiday.

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/prepare-to-drive-in-the-eu-after-brexit

From the above link, if the UK leaves without a deal, then we may have to obtain the following:

  • IDP – International Driver’s Permit – used to be £5 from the Post Office when I last got one for driving in Africa. Not needed in Ireland though – must organise a tour there – Stuart, another one for you to look at!
  • Green card – this proves you have valid insurance – may come with your policy or not, but worth checking a month before travel.
  • In case of an accident, claims have to be brought in the country of incident and in their language.
  • GB sticker – yep, back to the old style one! Which, by the way, we still had to have if driving in Switzerland.

The old rules of carrying the vehicle’s V5 document still applies as does travel insurance. EHIC cards could still be valid under a new agreement – but worth keeping an eye on this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-law-proposed-to-safeguard-uk-citizens-healthcare-abroad-after-brexit

Passportshttps://www.gov.uk/guidance/passport-rules-for-travel-to-europe-after-brexit There was talk of a 7Euro charge for a three year travel authorisation, ETIAS, into the Schengen zone.  Not heard much about this; if its similar to the ESTA for the USA, then it should take a few minutes  on-line to obtain – but, we’ll see.

Luckily nothing to onerous, but worth bearing in mind when touring into Europe after Brexit, deal or no deal.

 

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